Hammer

Triple Crown

“Bet” on Hammer
Hammer has raised $325

The past three years at Healing Reins have been a tremendous gift to my son, “Billy.” The time here has built his confidence, developed his social skills, and given him an emotional release. He looks forward to it every week.

He has been with his volunteer, John, this entire time. The support John has provided has been huge—we have even invited him to my son’s school concerts, and he has come! John is a true blessing. And my son’s instructor, Anvia, is wonderful at leading and guiding him, giving him independence and helping him to grow and learn.

My son was 9 – years old when he started at Healing Reins. For 2 1/2 years he rode Smokey, but he grew so big that he needed to change horses. He wasn’t too excited, because he absolutely loved Smokey. But the change to Hammer has been great. My son rose to the challenge of a new horse with a different personality. He succeeded in managing the change, and I am so proud of him.

The scholarships we’ve received at Healing Reins have been a huge relief and I am so very grateful.

“Billy’s” mom

Cascade Crest Transitions participates in Equine-Facilitated Psychotherapy at Healing Reins – a therapy founded on relationship, attachment, and the ability to attune to the horse. Week after week, I see our students let go of frustrations and I witness their genuine excitement to interact with their horses, like Hammer, who is a mainstay of the program.

It’s common to be nervous around these huge creatures, but it typically doesn’t take long for even our most anxious students to find more comfort than fear with their horses.

I’m continually excited to see how fast our students literally move when it comes to “arena time” and how quickly they apply lessons learned. This motivation for change is internal and can be brought back into clinical sessions week after week. So much of life is about effective communication and connection. Spending time with horses attunes us to what is going on internally—and what we need to let go of—to be truly in relationship with others.

Corey May, MS, LPC, Cascade Crest Transitions Therapist